Creating Your Character

Step 1 – Roll Your Stats: There are seven stats on your character sheet that provide an overview of your character’s physical and mental attributes.

  • Stat Descriptions
    • Communication: Do you have a silver tongue that can get you out of sticky situations or inspire those around you?
    • Constitution: Some people get winded from a short run, while others are hardier and can overcome illness and physical harm that would bring others down to their knees.
    • Dexterity: Are you a klutz that trips over your own feet, or graced with cat-like elegance that makes you light on your feet?
    • Intelligence: Knowledge and problem-solving combine to give you the upper hand in surviving the wild.
    • Perception: Your ability to have observe the world around you could be the difference between life and death.
    • Strength: The raw power of your body to move yourself and objects around you.
    • Willpower: Facing off against ferocious dinosaurs takes a level of courage that few have.
  • Rolling Stats
    • Roll 1d6 three times or roll 3d6 at once.
    • Add the three numbers together.
    • Write down this number on a scrap piece of paper.
    • Repeat the above steps six more times, for a total of seven numbers.
  • Assigning Stats
    • Assign the numbers you rolled in the above step to the stat of your choosing. If this is your first time playing, you may find it helpful to read the rest of this guide to help determine what stats you may want to assign the highest numbers in depending on the type of character you plan to create.
  • Stat Bonus
    • Depending on your stat score, your character will get a stat bonus which will be applied to skills and abilities. The following shows the corresponding stat bonus for the stat scores.
    • Score of 3-5 = Bonus of 0
    • Score of 6-8 = Bonus of 1
    • Score of 9-11 = Bonus of 2
    • Score of 12-14 = Bonus of 3
    • Score of 15-17 = Bonus of 4
    • Score of 18 = Bonus of 5
  • Example
    • I roll 3d6; getting a 5, 3 and 1 for a total of 9.
    • I repeat this process six more times getting the results of: 17, 5, 13, 16, 11, and 8.
    • I assign my stats and determine the bonuses based on the chart above. Here’s what my stats look like!

Step 2 – Choose Your Skills: Skills will be the primary abilities your character uses to interact with the world around them.

  • Example Use Cases for Skills
    • Acrobatics: Jumping across a ravine or climbing up the side of a cliff.
    • Computers: Hacking into computers to gain access to various computer systems from databases to security cameras.
    • Deception: Directly telling a lie to someone or attempting to mislead someone with what you’re saying or doing.
    • Driving: From an ATV to a jeep, this skill covers your performance during driving.
    • Electronics: The hardware side to the computer skill, this could be physically hacking an electronic door lock or repairing a walkie talkie.
    • Firearms: This skill is split into multiple categories that represent broad categories of firearms. This includes not only your skill at using these in combat, but also repairing firearms that may be found along your journey.
    • Intuition: Using your knowledge to logically work through a problem, this often comes in the form of a hint from the GM.
    • Investigation: This is an in-depth search of your surroundings and will take several rounds depending on how big an area you want to investigate.
    • Mechanics: Fixing a vehicle that won’t start or working on a motor that controls a lift.
    • Medicine: Healing yourself or your allies, or even a friendly dinosaur!
    • Navigation: Using a map or compass to pan a route from point A to point B.
    • Observation: This is the split-second version of Investigation. If you just want to quickly scan your surroundings for danger or a place of safety, then you’ll use observation.
    • Piloting: This covers everything that doesn’t fall under the driving skill, from small boats to airplanes.
    • Stealth: Hiding from both humans and dinosaurs by moving quietly, hiding your scent, or using the environment to your advantage.
  • Gaining Skill Points
    • First Level: At first level you gain 4 times your Intelligence bonus in skill points.
    • Future Levels: After the first level, you gain your intelligence bonus in skill points.
  • Spending Skill Points
    • Assign points to skills however you see fit, this number goes in the third column. There is not a limit the how many points you can assign to a skill, but a well-rounded character provides the best chance for success.
  • Skill Point Total
    • In the second column you will see a stat indicated. To calculate your skill point total, you will add the indicated stat bonus plus the skill points you invested to get your total. This number goes into the fourth column.
  • Example
    • I have an Intelligence bonus of 4, so at first level I will get 16 skill points.
    • I want to play a techie so I will spend 5 points on both Computers and Electronics leaving me with 6 skill points. I will split those into Engineering and Observation.
    • Next, I will calculate the total skill bonus that I will add to my rolls. For many skills I have invested 0 points, so the only bonus for these will come from my stat bonus. I will walk through a couple skills to show this process.
      • Acrobatics is a dexterity skill that I have invested 0 skill points in. Since my stat bonus for dexterity is also 0, my total skill bonus is 0 for acrobatics.
      • Computers is an intelligence skill that I have invested 4 skill points in. Since my stat bonus for intelligence is also 4, my total skill bonus is 8 for computers.
      • Deception is a communication skill that I have invested 0 skill points in. Since my stat bonus for communication is 2, my total skill bonus is 2 for deception.

Step 3 – Calculate Combat & Movement Abilities: This includes how fast you can move, how long you can run and how much health you have.

  • Speed
    • This ability is the number of tiles your character can move as part of a move action.
    • Your speed is calculated by adding 2 to your strength bonus.
    • Example
      • My character has a strength bonus of 1, so my total speed is 3.
  • Endurance
    • This ability allows you to double your movement speed, allowing you to move a total number of tiles equal to your endurance score at this increased speed. You can also move a total number of tiles equal to your endurance score to move through difficult terrain without taking the speed penalty.
    • Your endurance is calculated by taking your constitution bonus and multiplying it by 10.
    • Getting Exhausted
      • If you spend all your endurance score, your character is now exhausted which can be found in the Conditions section on your character sheet.
    • Restoring Endurance Points
      • You can restore half your Endurance score by resting for 3 hours.
      • You can restore your full Endurance score by resting for at least 8 hours.
      • Once you restore any endurance points, if your character was previously exhausted, that condition is removed.
    • Example
      • My character has a constitution bonus of 3, which means I have an endurance score of 30.
  • Defense
    • This ability represents your skill to naturally avoid danger through dodging attacks.
    • Your defense is calculated by adding 10 to your dexterity bonus.
    • Example
      • My character has a dexterity bonus of 0, which means my defense score is 10.
  • Armour Points
    • Armour allows you to ignore lesser attacks and damage.
    • Example
      • My character is wearing a padded vest that helps protect me from minor damage. It gives me 2 armor points, which allows me to ignore 2 points of damage every time I am hit. So, if a raptor tried to slash me with its claw, dealing 12 points of damage, I would only take 10 points of damage.
  • Hit Points
    • This represents your total health. For every level of your character, you will roll 1d6 and add your constitution bonus.
    • If your hit points ever fall to 0, you are now dying which can be found in the Conditions section on your character sheet.
    • Dying
      • If you are dying, then those around you have three rounds to successfully save your life using the Medicine skill. If they fail or can’t reach you at that time your character dies.
  • Thirst
    • This represents your character’s thirst level. Your character’s maximum thirst level is determined by adding 1 to your constitution bonus.
    • If your character reaches their maximum thirst level, then you will immediately become exhausted.
    • Adding Thirst Points
      • Every 8 hours add one thirst point.
        • If you’re in a dry, hot environment add two thirst points instead of one.
        • If your character is already at the maximum thirst level, you will instead take 10 points of damage.
    • Removing Thirst Points
      • Drinking a bottle of water or another drink will remove two thirst points.
  • Hunger
    • This represents your character’s hunger level. Your character’s maximum hunger level is determined by adding 4 to your constitution bonus.
    • If your character reaches their maximum hunger level, then you will immediately become exhausted.
    • Adding Hunger Points
      • Every 8 hours add one hunger point.
        • If your character is already at the maximum hunger level, you will instead take 5 points of damage.
    • Removing Hunger Points
      • Eating a ration or another portion of food will remove two hunger points.


Step 4 – Weapons and Equipment: Depending on the backstory for your campaign, what weapons and starting equipment you have can vary drastically. This will be left up to the GM but you can view a listing of weapons and equipment here. Talk to your GM about what weapons and equipment you will start with and record those on your character sheet.

You’re Ready to Play!